What if I need the CRT to accommodate a disability or special need?

Inclusivity and accessibility are core values at the CRT. We aim to provide special accommodations when needed.

Accommodations are not disclosed to anyone else in your dispute. The CRT only uses this information to determine what assistance we may be able to give you.

FAQ

  • What about immediate risk and urgency?

    CRT services are limited to dispute resolution, decisions, and orders. We can’t provide emergency response or law enforcement services.

    If you are concerned for your personal safety or require emergency services, call 911.

    In our online application for dispute resolution, we ask if there is an immediate risk that you will lose your job or become homeless because of this dispute. If you answer yes, we’ll ask you for more details.

    The CRT might be able to move the dispute through the process faster. This will depend on whether we have staff available to speed up the process. It can also depend on how fast everyone involved in the dispute can do the things they’re required to do.

  • What if I have difficulty reading and writing?

    The CRT processes rely heavily on written communications.

    Someone who has trouble reading or writing can tell us. We might be able to help by relying less on written communication. For example, it might use a teleconference where people do more talking.
    Someone who has difficulty reading and writing can also get help from a trusted friend or family member.

    If someone is helping you with reading or writing, it can’t be someone who you will use as a witness or who has a direct interest in the outcome of a claim in dispute. Your helper must also be over 19 years old.

  • What if I have difficulty with the English language?

    Most CRT services are delivered in English. We try to accommodate people who speak other languages, but may not have staff who can communicate in your language. Please see our information about the CRT in other languages.

    Under some circumstances, the CRT may be able to provide free interpretation services. In other cases, a party may have to pay for translation and interpretation services.

    You can also get help from a trusted friend or family member who is able to read, write, speak and understand English.

    If someone is helping you with translation or interpretation between English and another language, it can’t be someone who will be called as a witness or who has a direct interest in the outcome of a dispute. This person must also be over 19 years old.

  • What if I have a visual or hearing impairment?

    The CRT process uses a lot of written, and some telephone, communications. We will contact you to discuss what we can do to try to accommodate you. We will do our best to use a form of communication that will work best for you.

    You can also get help from a trusted friend or family member. A person who helps you communicate during the CRT process can’t be someone who will be called as a witness or who has a direct interest in the outcome of a claim in the dispute. This person must also be over 19 years old.

  • What if I can't or don't want to use a computer?

    The quickest way to use CRT services is online. Some CRT fees are also discounted for those who fill in forms online.

    If you can’t or don’t want to use a computer, smartphone or tablet, you could get help from a trusted friend or family member who can use this technology.

    A person who helps you access the CRT’s services can’t be someone who will be called as a witness or who has a direct interest in the outcome of a dispute. This person must also be over 19 years old.

    Your local library, school, or ServiceBC office may also have computers available for public use. The CRT has held workshops with librarians to provide them with information about helping customers to use library computers for CRT services.

    If you can’t access our services online, you can use the telephone, mail, or fax for most of our services.

  • Can I use ServiceBC?

    Yes. ServiceBC can:

    • Provide basic information about the CRT
    • Provide paper CRT forms
    • Accept paper CRT forms
    • Give you access to a Community Access Terminals for CRT services, including online filing and payment
    • Process payment for CRT services by cash, cheque, credit card and debit
    • Accept evidence submissions for CRT disputes

    Visit ServiceBC for more information and locations.

  • Children (under age of 19)

    In the Civil Resolution Tribunal, special rules apply to children.

    Under BC law, a child is someone under the age of 19.

    This table sets out a range of issues and special rules or circumstances that apply.

    Representation in the CRT process – Litigation Guardian

    A child must participate in the process through a litigation guardian. A litigation guardian is someone 19 years or older. A parent or legal guardian will often be the litigation guardian. A person who acts as a litigation guardian can’t also have an opposing interest in the claims relating to the child they are acting for.

    The person acting as a litigation guardian must provide a signed Litigation Guardian Declaration to the CRT. (Contact us for more information.)

    If no one is willing to act as the litigation guardian, the Public Guardian and Trustee for BC may be willing to do it.

    Representation in the CRT process – Representative
    A child can have a representative act for them without requesting permission from the CRT. If the dispute involves a personal injury, a child must be represented by a lawyer or a person supervised by a lawyer unless the litigation guardian is the Public Guardian and Trustee.


    Serving a Dispute Notice to a child
    An applicant for dispute resolution has to serve the Dispute Notice to the child’s parent or guardian, unless the CRT orders otherwise.


    Agreements involving a child
    If an agreement involves a child, the provisions of the BC Infants Act must be met before the CRT will make a consent resolution order. These requirements are quite detailed, and are not listed here. You may want to seek legal advice or contact the Public Guardian and Trustee for more information.


    CRT orders
    If a party is a child, the CRT can order a party to pay money for that child to the Public Guardian and Trustee on that child’s behalf.


    Dismissal of a dispute
    A person requesting the dismissal of a claim made by a child must get written consent from the Public Guardian and Trustee to make that request. This written consent has to be submitted to the CRT when the request for dismissal is made.


    Abandoning part of a claim

    If an application for dispute resolution involves a minor, and the minor’s litigation guardian intends to abandon more than 20% of the claim so it falls within the CRT’s monetary jurisdiction, the litigation guardian must first obtain the consent of the Public Guardian and Trustee.

  • Adults with Impaired Mental Capacity

    In the Civil Resolution Tribunal, special rules apply to adults with impaired mental capacity.

    We can’t provide a precise explanation of when an adult does or doesn’t have impaired mental capacity. We can tell you that it usually has to do with things like the adult’s ability to understand the significance or consequences of a decision. It also has to do with that adult’s ability to understand the information needed to make an informed decision.

    An adult might be mentally capable to make some decisions, but not others. An adult might be capable some of the time, but not other times.

    This table sets out a range of issues and special rules or circumstances that apply.

    Representation in the CRT process – Litigation Guardian
    An adult with impaired mental capacity must participate in the process through a litigation guardian. A litigation guardian must be 19 years or older.

    A person who acts as a litigation guardian can’t also have an opposing interest in the claims relating to the person they are acting for.

    The person acting as a litigation guardian must provide a signed Litigation Guardian Declaration to the CRT. (Contact us for more information.)

    If no one is willing to act as the litigation guardian, the Public Guardian and Trustee for BC may be willing to do it.


    Representation in the CRT process – Representative
    An adult with impaired mental capacity can have a representative act for them without asking the CRT’s permission.


    Serving a Dispute Notice to a respondent who is an adult with impaired mental capacity that has a committee of estate, representative appointed in a representation agreement or an attorney appointed under an enduring power of attorney
    If an applicant knows that a respondent has a committee of estate, representative appointed in a representation agreement or an attorney appointed under an enduring power of attorney, the applicant must serve the Dispute Notice to that person and to

    • The respondent or the person with whom the respondent normally lives, and
    • The Public Guardian and Trustee.

    Agreements involving an adult with impaired mental capacity
    If an agreement involves an adult with impaired mental capacity, the CRT must review the agreement to ensure that it’s fair, reasonable, and in that incapable adult’s best interests.

    This review isn’t something that’s required for agreements involving mentally capable adults.


    CRT orders
    If a party is an adult with impaired mental capacity, the CRT can order a party to pay money to the adult’s committee of estate, representative appointed under a representation agreement or attorney appointed under an enduring power of attorney on the adult’s behalf.

    If there isn’t a committee of estate, representative appointed under a representation agreement or attorney appointed under an enduring power of attorney, the CRT can order the money to be paid to the Public Guardian and Trustee on the mentally incapable adult’s behalf.


    Dismissal of a dispute
    A person requesting the dismissal of a claim made by an adult with impaired mental capacity must get written consent from the Public Guardian and Trustee to make that request.

    This written consent must be submitted to the CRT when making the request for dismissal.


    Abandoning part of a claim

    If an application for dispute resolution involves a person with impaired mental capacity, and the person’s litigation guardian intends to abandon more than 20% of the claim so it falls within the CRT’s monetary jurisdiction, the litigation guardian must first obtain the consent of the Public Guardian and Trustee.