Helpers and Representatives

If you need help with the CRT process, you may be able to have a helper or a representative.

There are exceptions for minors, and adults with impaired mental capacity. See the FAQ below for details.

 

What’s the difference between a helper and a representative?

Helper

  • A helper supports you.
  • A helper might be a trusted friend or family member, or an advocate.
  • They can do things like translate, help you organize your claim documents, or give you emotional support.
  • You don’t need CRT permission to have a helper.

Representative

  • A representative officially speaks for you.
  • A representative is usually a lawyer or advocate.
  • They communicate with the CRT for you, submit your evidence and other information, and make agreements for you.
  • For most claim types, you need to ask the CRT for permission to have a representative.
  • For most vehicle accident claims, you don’t need to ask the CRT for permission to have a lawyer represent you. But you must ask for permission if your representative isn’t a lawyer, for example an advocate or family member.

FAQ

  • Who can be a helper?

    You may want to ask a trusted friend, advocate, or family member to be your helper.

    A helper can translate something for you into English, help you organize or upload your claim documents, or give you emotional support. But you still have to do all the talking with the CRT.

    Your helper must be at least 19 years old. They can’t act as a witness in your claim. They also can’t be someone who would directly gain or lose based on the outcome of the claim.

  • Who can be a representative?

    A representative can be:

    • A practicing lawyer or a person supervised by a lawyer in BC.
    • A spouse, a relative, or a friend who has agreed to act as a representative.
    • Another person who has agreed to act as a representative.

    For most vehicle accident claims, you don’t need to ask the CRT for permission to have a lawyer represent you. But you must ask for permission if your representative isn’t a lawyer, for example an advocate or family member.

  • How do I ask the CRT for permission to have a representative?

    For most vehicle accident claims, you don’t need to ask the CRT for permission to have a lawyer represent you. But you must ask for permission if your representative isn’t a lawyer, for example an advocate or family member.

    If you make a CRT claim, our online application form will ask if you want to have a representative.

    If you respond to a CRT claim made against you, the response form will ask if you want to have a representative.

    Any party in a CRT claim can ask for permission later in the process, too. Fill out and submit our Representative Request Form.

    The CRT will consider factors like:

    • If any other party in the claim is represented and if so, whether that representative is a lawyer or other person supervised by a lawyer.
    • If every party in the dispute has agreed to representation.
    • If the person proposed as the representative is appropriate.
    • Which stage of the dispute resolution process the dispute is in.
    • If it’s in the interests of justice and fairness for the party to have a representative.
  • Can a strata, company, society or organization have a representative?

    A strata, company, society, or organization isn’t automatically allowed to have a representative. They must ask the CRT for permission.

    But a contact person must speak on the organization’s behalf during the CRT process. This contact person must be:

    • Strata corporation: an authorized member of the strata council
    • Section of a strata corporation: an authorized member of the section executive
    • Incorporated entity: a director, officer or authorized employee
    • Partnership: a partner or authorized employee
    • Unincorporated entity using a business name: the owner of the business or any authorized employee
  • Where can I find a representative?

    Our FAQ has links for finding low-cost or free legal advice, and other suggestions.

  • What if a party is a minor, or an adult with impaired mental capacity?

    Minors (under 19) and adults with impaired mental capacity must be represented in the CRT process by a litigation guardian. They don’t need to ask the CRT for permission to have this representative.

    The litigation guardian must be 19 years or older. A parent or legal guardian is often the litigation guardian.

    The litigation guardian must fill out and send us a Litigation Guardian Declaration form.

  • I'm an insurance company providing coverage for paying damages in a claim. Do I need to ask permission to be a representative?

    Under the CRT Rules, an insurer may represent their insured without asking the CRT for permission if they are making a claim to recover from a third party an amount paid under an insurance policy, or may be required to provide coverage to pay damages in a dispute.