How can I identify the parties in my dispute?

The following table shows common types of parties. It also includes information on how to identify them. (There may be more types, and different ways to identify them.)

Common Types of Parties

Person

  • Use the person’s legal first and last names
  • In some cases you will have the option to list other names the person goes by
  • Include the person’s address

Adult with Impaired Mental Capacity

  • In addition to the information you normally include for a person, also include any information you have about the person’s committee of estate, representative appointed under a representation agreement or attorney appointed under an enduring power of attorney

Child (under 19 years old)

  • In addition to the information you normally include for a person, also include information about the child’s litigation guardian
  • If you don’t have any information about the child’s litigation guardian, include information about the person the child normally resides with

Strata Corporation

  • Identify the strata corporation’s strata plan registration number assigned by the Land Title Office. It’s important to use the information provided by the Land Title Office, since that is the legal address. If you don’t use the legal address, a CRT decision may not be enforceable.
  • Examples of strata plan registration numbers are KAS 9876 or LMS 1234
  • The name of the strata corporation will be “The Owners, Strata Plan [the registration number of the strata plan]”

Company or extraprovincial company as defined by the Business Corporations Act

  • Identify the company by the name on record with the Registrar of Companies. It’s important to use the info provided by the Registrar of Companies, since that is the legal address. If you don’t use the legal address, a CRT decision may not be enforceable.
  • Examples of company names are “ABC Ltd.”and “ABC Inc
  • Find more details on searches of the Corporate Registry from BC Registry Services.

Sole proprietorship

  • Identify the person who is the sole proprietor in the same way you ordinarily name a person
  • You may want to search the Corporate Registry to see if the business is registered

Society incorporated under the Society Act

  • Identify the society’s legal name on record with the Corporate Registry.
  • It’s important to use the information provided by the Corporate Registry, since that is the legal address. If you don’t use the legal address, a CRT decision may not be enforceable.
  • Find more details on searches of the Corporate Registry from BC Registry Services

Partnership

  • Identify the partnership by its name
  • You may want to search the Corporate Registry to see if the partnership is registered.
  • If the partnership is registered, it’s important to use the information provided by the Corporate Registry, since that is the legal address. If you don’t use the legal address, a CRT decision may not be enforceable.
  • It is common practice to also name every partner as a separate party as well in addition to the partnership

Still unsure how you can identify the parties in a dispute?

The CRT can’t identify the parties for you. If you are still having trouble identifying parties, you may want to get support from a trusted friend or family member. You can also hire a lawyer to help you. However they won’t be able to speak for you, unless the CRT gives you permission to have a representative.

Helpers/Representatives