What is a Dispute Notice, and how do I provide it to respondents?

If the CRT accepts your application for dispute resolution, it will send you a Dispute Notice package. You must provide the Dispute Notice package to every respondent in the dispute within 90 days. If you don’t provide the Dispute Notice to all respondents within 90 days, the CRT may dismiss your dispute.

There are 4 steps you need to take to provide notice to the respondent(s):

  • 1 Review the Dispute Notice provided by the CRT

    If the CRT accepts your application for dispute resolution, it will send you a Dispute Notice package. The Dispute Notice looks like this. Review it to make sure the parties are correct. Make sure to check the names and addresses carefully. Report errors to the CRT immediately.

  • 2 Identify the type of respondent you are providing the Dispute Notice package to

    The methods for providing a Dispute Notice package will depend on the type of respondent. The applicant has to identify the type of respondent and provide the Dispute Notice package properly according to the CRT rules.

    Person

    • Email
    • Registered mail or courier delivery requiring signature
    • Delivery in person
    • Fax

    Adult with Impaired Mental Capacity

    • Email
    • Registered mail or courier delivery requiring signature
    • Delivery in person
    • Fax

    The Dispute Notice package must be provided to the adult or the person with whom the adult normally lives and to the adult’s committee of estate, representative appointed under a representation agreement or attorney appointed in an enduring power of attorney. The Dispute Notice package must also be provided to the Public Guardian and Trustee.


    Child

    • Email
    • Registered mail or courier delivery requiring signature
    • Delivery in person
    • Fax

    The Dispute Notice package must be provided to the child’s parent or guardian unless the tribunal orders otherwise.


    Strata Corporation

    • Registered mail or courier delivery requiring a signature or delivery in person to the most recent address in the Land Title Office
    • Delivery in person to a strata council member

    Company as defined by the Business Corporations Act

    • Registered mail or courier delivery requiring a signature or delivery in person to the address shown for the registered office with the Registrar of Companies
    • Delivery in person to the place of business of the company, to a receptionist or a person who appears to manage or control the company’s business there
    • Delivery in person to a director, officer, liquidator, trustee in bankruptcy or receiver manager of the company

    Extraprovincial Company as defined by the Business Corporations Act

    • Registered mail or courier delivery requiring a signature or delivery in person to the address shown for the head office in the office of the Registrar of Companies if that head office is in BC
    • Registered mail or delivery in person to the address shown in the office of the Registrar of Companies for any attorney appointed for the extraprovincial company
    • Delivery in person to the place of business of the extraprovincial company, to a receptionist or a person who appears to manage or control the company’s business there
    • Delivery in person to a director, officer, liquidator, trustee in bankruptcy or receiver manager of the extraprovincial company

    Society incorporated under the Society Act

    • Registered mail or courier delivery requiring a signature or delivery in person to the address for service with the Registrar of Companies
    • Delivery in person to a director, officer, receiver manager or liquidator of the society

    Partnership

    • Registered mail or courier delivery requiring signature, or delivery in person to a partner
    • Delivery in person to the partnership’s place of business, to a receptionist or to a person who appears to manage or control the partnership’s business there.

    Trade union, municipality, extraprovincial society, unincorporated association, party outside Canada

    • Complete a Request for Directions on How to Provide Notice Form and provide it to the Tribunal, and completing the steps and following the directions provided by the tribunal

  • 3 Provide the Dispute Notice package to every respondent in the dispute according to the method required

    The methods for providing a Dispute Notice package will depend on the type of respondent. The applicant has to identify the type of respondent and provide the Dispute Notice package properly according to the CRT rules.

    Once you have identified the type of respondent, you can decide on a method for providing notice using the table above. These are the methods:

    Email
    Send the Dispute Notice package to the respondent’s email address. The respondent must send you a reply confirming receipt, or the CRT will not accept the email as service. Keep both of these emails.
    If you don’t receive a reply from the respondent confirming receipt of the Dispute Notice package by the deadline, you have to use another method.


    Registered mail
    Send the Dispute Notice package by registered mail to the respondent’s address. Keep the delivery confirmation information.


    Delivery in person
    Leave the Dispute Notice package with the respondent. Don’t try to hide it inside of something. The respondent has to be able to see that it’s a Dispute Notice package.


    Fax
    Fax the Dispute Notice package to the respondent’s fax number. Keep your copy of the fax confirmation sheet.


    Courier
    Send the Dispute Notice package by courier to the respondent’s address. The courier must get a signature from someone at the respondent’s address. Keep the delivery confirmation information.


    Examples of providing notice:

    1. An applicant has to provide a Dispute Notice package to a person. The applicant sends it by email to the respondent. The respondent confirms receipt by reply before the deadline.
    2. An applicant has to provide a Dispute Notice package to a person. The applicant sends it by email the respondent. The respondent does not confirm receipt by email before the deadline. The applicant then decides to send the Dispute Notice package by registered mail. After the applicant sends the Dispute Notice package by registered mail, she receives a delivery confirmation from Canada Post.
    3. An applicant has to provide a Dispute Notice package to a strata corporation. The applicant delivers a copy of the Dispute Notice package in person to a strata council member.
    4. An applicant has to provide a Dispute Notice package to a BC company. The applicant decides to send it by registered mail. The applicant gets the address for the registered office for the company from the Registrar of Companies. The applicant then mails the Dispute Notice package to that address.

  • 4 Complete the Proof of Notice Form

    After you have provided the Dispute Notice package to the respondent, complete the Proof of Notice Form. The CRT will provide you with this form. The Proof of Notice Form must be returned to the CRT within 10 days of providing notice.

    Proof of Notice Rules

I gave a Dispute Notice package to someone. What happens if they don’t respond?

You’ll have to prove that you followed the instructions for giving notice, and that you submitted the Proof of Notice Form to the CRT.

If the CRT agrees that you gave notice properly, a CRT member can issue a default order. This means that the dispute resolution process will continue without input from a person who didn’t respond.

How Do I Respond To A Dispute Notice?

Respond to a Dispute Notice