What happens after I receive a CRT decision?

You’ve received your CRT tribunal decision and order. What’s next?

Your next steps depend on your dispute type (strata or small claims) and the type of decision you received (default or merit). See below for details.

If you don’t agree with the CRT decision, see below for details.

Next Steps

  • How do I enforce my strata order?

    For strata decisions where the Dispute Notice was issued on or before December 31, 2018 you can only file a CRT strata order with either court if one of the following applies:

    • It is an approved draft consent resolution order.
    • The time for appeal to the BC Supreme Court has expired. The time for appeal is 28 days after a party is given notice of a final decision of the CRT.
    • Leave to appeal is denied.
    • The appeal is heard and the BC Supreme Court confirms the decision of the Tribunal.
    • If an appeal is heard, and the BC Supreme Court amends the decision of the Tribunal, the decision of the Tribunal as amended may be enforced by filing, in the BC Supreme Court, a validated copy of the order of the Tribunal and the order of the BC Supreme Court.

    When you file a CRT order with a court, the order has the same force and effect as if it were a judgment of that court. Whether you file your order in Supreme Court or Provincial Court, the enforcement procedures are in the court’s jurisdiction. For information on Supreme Court, please visit the BC Supreme Court Guidebook on Enforcing Court Orders. For information on provincial court, please visit the BC Provincial Court website.

    There is no appeal process for strata decisions if the Dispute Notice was issued January 1, 2019 or later. These decisions can be filed for enforcement immediately. You can do this if your order is either a consent resolution order, or a final decision.

  • How do I enforce my small claims order?

    Under the Civil Resolution Tribunal Act, section 58.1, a CRT order may be enforced by filing it in the BC Provincial Court. You can do this if your order is either a consent resolution order, or a final decision.

    You will need to provide the BC Provincial Court with a validated copy of the order. A validated copy of your CRT order will be sent to you after the time limit for making a Notice of Objection has expired (approximately 29 days after the date of the CRT decision).

    Once you receive your small claims order, you can file it immediately. If you don’t receive a validated copy of your order after 30 days, please contact us.

    When you file a CRT order with the BC Provincial Court, it has the same force and effect as if it were a judgment of the BC Provincial Court. The enforcement procedures are within the Court’s jurisdiction. For information, please visit the BC Provincial Court website.

  • What if there is a typo or mathematical error in the decision or order?

    The CRT can correct typos or errors, but cannot change the outcome of the decision.

    If there is a typo or mathematical error in your decision, please contact your facilitator.

  • What if I'm not happy with a default decision?

    The Civil Resolution Tribunal Act and the CRT Rules provide a process for a party to apply to the CRT to cancel a decision made when a party defaults or is non-compliant.

    A default occurs where a Respondent served with a Dispute Notice does not file a Dispute Response within the timeline required by the CRT Rules.

    Non-compliance is when a party fails to comply with the CRT Rules or a direction or order of the tribunal.

    For more details, see the CRT Rules.

    To ask the CRT to cancel a default decision, submit a Request Cancellation of Decision form and a Dispute Response form and pay the fee.

    Certain tribunal decisions in small claims matters may be subject to judicial review by the British Columbia Supreme Court. You may want to get legal advice.

  • What if I don’t agree with a final decision?

    Strata decisions:

    If you don’t agree with a CRT strata decision and the Dispute Notice was issued on or before December 31, 2018, you can ask the BC Supreme Court for permission (called leave) to appeal the decision.

    If you don’t agree with a CRT strata decision and the Dispute Notice was issued January 1, 2019 or later, you can ask the BC Supreme Court for judicial review of the decision.

    For more information about making a Supreme Court of BC application, see the Supreme Court of BC Online Help Guide.

     

    Small Claims decisions:

    If you disagree with the CRT’s final decision on a small claims dispute, you may be able to pay a fee and file a Notice of Objection with the CRT.

    The Notice of Objection must be filed within 28 days after a party receives a CRT decision. The CRT cannot issue an order in a small claims dispute until the deadline for filing a Notice of Objection expires.

    If a Notice of Objection is filed, the CRT decision is not enforceable. If any party wants to continue any of the claims that were included in the dispute, that party must file a Notice of CRT Claim in the BC Provincial Court. The CRT will provide a Certificate of Completion to all the parties. The Certificate of Completion must be included with the Notice of CRT Claim, or the Provincial Court registry will not accept it.

    A party who has defaulted in the tribunal process cannot make a Notice of Objection. This includes parties who didn’t respond to a Dispute Notice, who stopped participating in the tribunal process, or who did not comply with the CRT Rules or an order or direction of the tribunal.

    Here are some things about the Notice of CRT Claim process that you should know:

    • You will get a new process with the BC Provincial Court, including a settlement conference or pre-trial conference and a trial.
    • The Small Claims Rules specify which Provincial Court registry the Notice of CRT Claim must be filed in.
    • Once filed, the filing party must serve the Notice of CRT Claim on the other parties.
    • The Provincial Court may order a party to pay a deposit for some or all of the amount of the CRT decision.
    • If the person who filed the Notice of Objection does not have a better outcome in the BC Provincial Court than in the CRT’s decision, the Provincial Court may order that party to pay a penalty to the other party.

    For information, visit the BC Provincial Court website.

    To file a Notice of Objection, fill out and submit a Notice of Objection form. The CRT will contact you for payment of the applicable fee.

    Certain tribunal decisions in small claims matters may be subject to judicial review by the British Columbia Supreme Court. You may want to get legal advice.

  • Where are CRT decisions published?

    CRT decisions are published online and are searchable.

    You can also sign up to be sent an email when the CRT publishes a new decision.

  • What if I have a concern about how my dispute was handled?

    The CRT is committed to resolving disputes in accordance with the Civil Resolution Tribunal Act, the CRT rules, and the tribunal’s standards of conduct.

    If you have a concern about the way the CRT has handled your dispute, please contact us.

    Please make sure to include:
    • Who you are
    • How we can reach you
    • The CRT dispute number
    • Your specific concerns
    • If applicable, the date, times, and people involved

    The CRT will review your concerns, and provide a response.